Thanksgiving Pies

pies

Left to right: Pumpkin, Cherry, Apple

I think I probably made my first pie when I was around 12 or 13.  It was sort of like a rite of passage.  It was, however, a much more pleasant rite of passage than everything else teenage girls had to go through.  My maternal grandma taught both my sister and I how to make pies.  I remember rolling out a perfect pie crust to start with, and my grandma praised me so much for it.  Being a typical youngest child, anything that gets me positive attention gets a repeat.  I thought that pie making would be my thing.  And while I do love making pies, I’m not so sure I’m as good as I thought I was when I was 12.  My sister is the true pie expert in our family.  Since she couldn’t make it home this year, I made the pies.  Sometimes I think it would be easier to just buy a crust, but where’s the fun in that?

Also… for the pumpkin pie, I just used the recipe on the back of a Libby’s Pumpkin Pie Filling can.  I’ve tried using real pumpkin, but in my opinion the can is just a lot easier and tastes better.

As I’m writing this, I’m thinking I should have tried something a lot simpler for my first post, but we will get through it together.   Remember, it’s my first time.  Please, please, please be patient.  Hopefully, I’ll get the hang of all the formatting stuff.

This pie crust recipe dates back to at least when my older sister made pies for 4-H.  The recipe we have on hand is copied down on a piece of paper that has details for the 4-H Song Contest on the back, so it’s not too thorough.  I will do my best to give better directions, but just ask if you have questions… and then I will ask my mom what she would do.  I think in general, a good rule of thumb is to mix all ingredients so they stick together and form a ball, but you really don’t want to over mix it.  If you over-mix, the dough will become tough and you might become grumpy.  Not that I know anything about making an imperfect pie crust or being grumpy…

“Good Pie Crust”

3 cups flour

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. sugar

1 tsp. baking powder

1 egg

1/3 cup cold water

1 tsp. vinegar

1 cup lard or Crisco

Mix dry ingredients with pastry blender.  Add in Crisco.   (Side note:  I hardly ever bake anything with Crisco anymore, so it seems silly to have a big thing of Crisco on hand.  I do, however, LOVE Crisco Baking Sticks.  They come wrapped like butter and are so much easier to measure and add into recipes.) Beat egg; add water and vinegar.  Add egg, water, and vinegar into Crisco and dry ingredients mixture.  Form into a ball.  Let “rest” before making into pies.    This crust recipe will make enough for one 2-crust pie and one 1-crust pie.  For example:  An apple pie and a pumpkin pie.

I don’t really know what tips to give on rolling the dough out.  I usually just cover everything with a lot of flour.  If you are at all worried about making a mess, I think you can roll it out between 2 sheets of wax or parchment paper.  And… I do have to say… Although I usually LOVE my pampered chef utensils, I much prefer our basic rolling pin to their fancy pie rolling pin.

The recipes for fruit pie came from the 1969 edition of the Betty Crocker Cookbook.  This might be my favorite cookbook.  When we were little, my sister and I would experiment with all the muffin recipes.  I didn’t think anything of it then, but our mother had to have been so patient to put up with that kind of mess every Saturday morning.

The recipes include amounts for 8, 9, and 10-inch pies.  I made a 10-inch cherry pie and a 9-inch apple pie, so I will probably just include the recipes for those.  If you would like the recipes for other sizes, let me know and I can post them!

10-inch Cherry Pie

1 2/3 cups sugar

½ cup Flour

3 cans (1 pound each) pitted red tart cherries, drained

1 teaspoon almond extract

3 tablespoons butter or margarine

Cherry Pie Filling: This might be my favorite color combination.

Heat oven to 425 degrees.  Stir together sugar and flour; mix with cherries.  Turn into pastry-lined pie pan; sprinkle with almond extraxt and dot with butter.  Cover with top crust which has slits cut in it; seal and flute.  Cover edge with 2- to 3-inch strip of aluminum foil to prevent excessive browning;  remove foil last 15 minutes of baking.  Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until crust is brown and juice begins to bubble through slits in crust.  Side note:  I usually brush my crust with an egg wash.  Usually I just mix an egg with a little bit of cream or milk.  In the past I’ve done this as a last step, but yesterday Paula brushed her crust before cutting the strips for her lattice crust.  I might try that next time.  I should also note that the last time I made the cherry pie, I was also making an apple and pumpkin pie.  I thought it would be more time efficient to make the fillings for the different pies then roll out the crusts.  By the time I got around to putting the cherry filling in the crust, there was a lot of juice so I had to scoop a lot out.  Next time, I’ll immediately fill the crust and put it in the oven to avoid this dilemma.

9-inch Apple Pie

¾ cup sugar

¼ cup Flour

½ teaspoon nutmeg

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Dash salt

6 cups thinly sliced pared tart apples (I believe I used Golden Delicious)

2 tablespoons butter or margarine

Apple Pie Filling

Heat oven to 425 degrees.  Stir together sugar, flour, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt; mix with apples.  Turn into pastry-lined pie pan; dot with butter.  Cover with top crust which has slits cut in it (I chose to do a lattice top); seal and flute.  Cover edge with 2- to 3- inch strip of aluminum foil to prevent excessive browning; remove foil last 15 minutes of baking.  Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until crust is brown and juice begins to bubble through slits in crust.

Thanks to my mom for finding this awesome apron at TJ Maxx!

I’m always sooo bad at knowing what to do on 2-crust pies to seal the crust.  I usually just kind of pinch the two crusts together, but I would appreciate any help on what you do!  I just never thing that part of my pies looks quite polished enough.

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